As Thanksgiving and the rest of the holiday season approaches, you may fear for your diet and fitness routine. It can be easy to fall behind on workout routines, indulge in more food and relaxation time, and possibly end up sending yourself backward on your fitness journey! However, some simple steps can be taken to help decrease the negative impact of your upcoming Thanksgiving feast, giving you the room to enjoy the holiday while also avoiding a bigger setback:

1 – Don’t focus on appetizers and finger food! If your Thanksgiving dinner starts with appetizers earlier on, then try to pass or skimp on them in order to focus on the real meal. These are both extra calories to digest as well as harmful to your appetite for the main course.

2 – Pass on buns, rolls, and other types of bread. These extra sources of butter, flour, and carbs are not only potentially harmful to your diet, but they can also work to distract from the main course. Who wants to fill their appetite too quickly on another aspect of the meal that isn’t the main focus? Moreover, saving this room for meats, vegetables, and other foods can prove more nutritious.

3 – Try to skimp on gravy, sweet sauces, butter, and other holiday extras! These meal add-ons are often full of sugars, fats, and extra calories that can weigh down the effects of the meal as a whole. Focusing on limiting or avoiding them is best!

4 – Avoid the dark meat and skin of the turkey. Both of these parts are high in fat, especially the skin, in varying intensities depending on how it’s cooked. The lighter meat is far preferable, with fewer fats and calories.

These small steps can make a large impact on your Thanksgiving food intake, limiting the negative effects of the meal. If continued throughout the holiday season, they can surely make a difference in helping you avoid an all-around fitness setback. This, coupled with the continuation of your regular workout routine, can ensure you only continue to move forward. Count on Platinum Fitness to get you through the season!

A diet containing complex carbs – read ‘lots of dietary fibre’ – makes rats with a dodgy pancreas slimmer and more muscled, we wrote a few days ago. A similar diet has the same effect on mice with a normal pancreas, researchers at the Children’s Hospital Boston discovered. What’s more, carbohydrates that are difficult for the body to absorb made the animals more physically active.

The researchers divided a group of male mice into two groups. Both groups were given a diet that consisted for 60 percent by weight of starch for a period of 40 weeks. In the control group the starch used consisted entirely of amylopectin; and in the experimental group it consisted of 40 percent amylopectin and 60 percent less easily absorbed amylose.

The difference between amylose and amylopectin lies in their structure. Amylopectin is a branched chain. The digestive enzymes can loosen the glucose molecules from the amylopectin at different locations at the same time and absorb them. This process goes pretty fast. Amylose, on the other hand, is a straightforward chain of glucose units.

To be digested the units have to be loosened one by one, and that takes time. Most of the glucose molecules are not absorbed by the body.

The sugar chains that are not absorbed form an ideal medium for beneficial micro-organisms in the large intestine to feed off. These convert glucose into short-chain free fatty acids. Researchers suspect that the positive effects of fibre – fibre is a collective noun for all carbohydrate chains that your small intestine can’t digest, and which are partially or wholly fermented in the large intestine by micro-organisms – are partly a result of the work of the short-chain fatty acids. These are thought to boost the metabolism a little.

The starch combination had no effect on body weight, but it did affect fat mass. That means that they built up more lean body mass.

The researchers came up with two partial reasons for the positive body recompositioning effect of the slow carbs. The respiratory quotient [RQ] of the mice that ate slow carbs was lower. That means that they burned a little more fat and less carbs. But perhaps a more important factor was that the mice moved more.

The researchers registered the mice’s movement by placing light-sensitive sensors in their cage, and the mice that ate slow carbs moved more. So they were more physically active. “Higher levels of physical activity are characteristically associated with greater lean body mass”, the researchers suggest cautiously. Between the lines you can see that they don’t think that that little bit of extra exercise in the SAC mice doesn’t explain their different body composition. Nevertheless, the increase in physical activity is in itself interesting.

“A low glycemic diet could increase spontaneous physical activity level, a possibility that might have important implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity and promotion of physical fitness”, the researchers conclude.

For more information about how this and other nutritional subjects, be sure to contact one of our personal trainers today. Not a member? Take advantage of the 50% off voucher now!

Source:
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Nov;295(5):E1126-31.

Source: http://www.ergo-log.com/slowcarbsmuscular.html

Nutrient timing is based upon the premise that providing nutrients— primarily protein and carbohydrate— at a certain time in relation to an exercise bout will lead to greater adaptations to training, compared to getting your nutrition haphazardly. Most believers are convinced the ideal time is after intense training.

A recent review and position paper by the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) looked at nutrient timing in relation to exercise performance, glycogen repletion, and training adaptations (body composition, muscle mass, and muscle fiber size).1 One conclusion was that ingesting a carb + protein supplement after training promotes greater increases in strength and more favorable changes in lean mass and fat mass.

Nutrient timing has been embraced by most everyone as crucial, but is it?

Most of us in the gym can’t wait to grab the post-workout supplement after our workout. We’ve read it’s critical immediately following our workout, or is it? Let’s look at a couple studies that examined nutrient timing in athletes and novice fitness enthusiasts.

One study took 23 non-competitive, young (early 20s) Australian bodybuilders with an average of three years of experience and matched them for max strength (1 rep max; 1RM). Half of the group then took a carb + protein + creatine monohydrate supplement (40 percent protein from whey protein isolate, 43 percent dextrose, and 7 percent creatine monohydrate) just before and just after training (four personal training supervised sessions in the mid-late afternoon/week for 10 weeks). The other half took the same supplement twice daily on training days (same training regimen as pre-post group), yet before breakfast and before sleep (a.m.-p.m.) on the same training days.

If you accept that the subjects in the a.m.-p.m. group didn’t eat or drink anything for 1-2 hours after they trained— for 10 weeks— then the results for the pre-post group are distinctive: greater lean mass gains and fat mass drops; greater 1RM in squats and bench press; bigger muscle fibers and more contractile protein (not just muscle protein); higher muscle creatine and glycogen content. Again, this is the only study using resistance-trained subjects AND where timing is compared. Admirably, the lead author of the study disclosed that he is a consultant to AST (disclosure is not common— trust me).

Another study looked at 30 northeast American college football players (late teens/early 20s), with an average of almost six years of resistance training, and three powerlifters were assigned to either 1) take a liquid protein supplement pre-post, 2) take it in the a.m.-p.m., or 3) take a placebo supplement. All three groups followed a 10-week supervised training regimen (four sessions/week). The liquid protein supplement delivered 42 grams of protein (enzymatically predigested beef collagen, whey protein isolate, casein) and 2 grams of carbs.3 Unlike the prior study, the subjects took the supplement every day during the 10 weeks.

After 10 weeks no significant difference in body comp or any measure of squat or bench press performance was seen between any of the groups, including the placebo group. Modest improvements in strength and power were seen in the two supplemented groups, but they were not significantly greater than the placebo group.

Why the different results between the only two studies done in resistance-trained subjects putting chronic nutrient timing in the hot seat? The first study used bodybuilders who took in about 30 percent more calories (mostly from carbs, not including the supplement), weighed less, and were much leaner. The bodybuilders also were taking in about 10-25 percent more protein at the beginning of the study than the football players. The bodybuilders also supplemented with carbs and creatine monohydrate in addition to protein.

Despite the football players/powerlifters getting the protein supplement every day for 10 weeks, there was no difference. This is not a revelation— more protein does not automatically beget more muscle mass. What may be the revelation is that supplemental calories/carbs may make a difference when protein is at the ceiling of intakes.

As it stands, nutrient timing-mediated muscle and strength gains in resistance-trained men is superior for whey protein isolate + dextrose + creatine monohydrate.

Let Platinum Fitness help you reach your goals. See a Platinum Fitness Personal Trainer today.


Anthony Almada (B.Sc., M.Sc.) has worked within the dietary supplement industry since 1975. He has a B.Sc. in physiology and nutritional biochemistry minor from California State University, Long Beach, and an M.Sc. from Berkeley. He has been a co-investigator on over 60 university clinical trials, ranging from arthritis to muscle building and fat loss. Anthony Almada is a member of the executive board of ISSN, and is a fellow of the ISSN.

References:
1. Kerksick C, et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 2008;5:17.
2. Cribb PJ, Hayes A: Effects of supplement timing and resistance exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Med Sci Sports Exerc, 2006;38:1918-25.
3. Hoffman JR, et al. Effect of protein supplement timing on strength, power and body compositional changes in resistance-trained men. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, (published online advance of print; accessed 13 March 2009).

Source: http://www.musculardevelopment.com/component/content/article/135-supplements/3364-on-time-off-target-nutrient-timing-for-the-md-reader-by-anthony-almada.html

It’s been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Even so, if you’re like many people, you skip it anyway. Recent research now conventional wisdom has been correct. The conclusion of researchers at the University of Missouri who studied the topic is that people who eat a balanced breakfast, especially one high in protein, experience less hunger throughout the day, which means less snacking and fewer bad calories.

The dieters in a cognitive behavioral program for weight loss and maintenance often come in skipping breakfast. They say they don’t have time; they aren’t hungry in the morning; they would rather save their calories for later in the day. First, they should do problem-solving to help them find the time. Second, they need to respond to sabotaging thoughts that are likely to get in the way of their adopting the new habit of having breakfast.

When dieters say they don’t have enough time in the morning, they need to consider which a.m. tasks they can omit, postpone, do the night before, delegate to other people or spend less time on (at least temporarily, until breakfast becomes an easy routine). Sabotaging thoughts often get in the way:
• I don’t want to get up earlier.
• I can’t leave dishes in the sink.
• My kids won’t like it if I ask them to make their own lunches.
• I’d rather pick out my clothes in the morning.
• I can’t ask my spouse to help out with the kids.

It’s then helpful to create written responses to these kinds of thoughts that remind them that it’s unrealistic to believe that continuing to skip breakfast will lead to success — after all, it hasn’t in the past. There may, in fact, be a physiological reason why people who struggle to lose weight tend to eat too much later on in the day. And the changes they make to free up time for breakfast will soon become second nature.When dieters say they aren’t hungry in the morning, it’s important to find out what times during the day they are hungry, and what their eating patterns are like.

It is likely that these dieters consume most of their calories in the evening, often eating right up until they go to bed. No wonder they’re not hungry in the morning.

But according to research (and clinical experience), skipping breakfast may indeed lead to less control over eating later on. Try an  an experiment for at least a couple of weeks: eat a protein-rich breakfast and then monitor your day and evening eating. You’ll end up with the same conclusion: eating (a balanced) breakfast really helps you eat more reasonably for the rest of the day.

Another important reason to eat your morning meal is if you’re one of those that workout in the morning. Eating before exercise is mandatory for (you) performance athletes to get the most out of your workout, recovery, and the results. Therefore, ingesting part of your daily calorie allotment before exercise is a practice everyone should do. Eating before training can:

• Fill energy stores before a workout
• Break the fast to boost metabolism and continue a constant flow of nutrients
• Increase workout performance: high intensity training burns two to three times more fat immediately post-exercise, thus greater total fat throughout the day
• Enhance recovery to improve maintenance or growth of muscle which also adds to your metabolic rate
• Increase daily non-exercise movements by never staying in a less energetic/fasting state beyond rising in the morning

It takes calories to burn more calories, but don’t add extra calories – simply take the total daily calories you are allowed and distribute them properly throughout the day based on your activities.

The bottom line is make sure you eat the most important meal of the day, breakfast.

Leidy, H. J., Lepping, R. J., Savage, C. R., & Harris, C. T. (5 May 2011).
Neural Responses to Visual Food Stimuli After a Normal vs. Higher Protein Breakfast in Breakfast-Skipping Teens: A Pilot fMRI Study.
Obesity Journal, (1-7). doi:10.1038/oby.2011.108

Sources:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/judith-s-beck-phd/breakfast-benefits_b_883021.html
http://www.dotfit.com/content-1498.html