It’s been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Even so, if you’re like many people, you skip it anyway. Recent research now conventional wisdom has been correct. The conclusion of researchers at the University of Missouri who studied the topic is that people who eat a balanced breakfast, especially one high in protein, experience less hunger throughout the day, which means less snacking and fewer bad calories.

The dieters in a cognitive behavioral program for weight loss and maintenance often come in skipping breakfast. They say they don’t have time; they aren’t hungry in the morning; they would rather save their calories for later in the day. First, they should do problem-solving to help them find the time. Second, they need to respond to sabotaging thoughts that are likely to get in the way of their adopting the new habit of having breakfast.

When dieters say they don’t have enough time in the morning, they need to consider which a.m. tasks they can omit, postpone, do the night before, delegate to other people or spend less time on (at least temporarily, until breakfast becomes an easy routine). Sabotaging thoughts often get in the way:
• I don’t want to get up earlier.
• I can’t leave dishes in the sink.
• My kids won’t like it if I ask them to make their own lunches.
• I’d rather pick out my clothes in the morning.
• I can’t ask my spouse to help out with the kids.

It’s then helpful to create written responses to these kinds of thoughts that remind them that it’s unrealistic to believe that continuing to skip breakfast will lead to success — after all, it hasn’t in the past. There may, in fact, be a physiological reason why people who struggle to lose weight tend to eat too much later on in the day. And the changes they make to free up time for breakfast will soon become second nature.When dieters say they aren’t hungry in the morning, it’s important to find out what times during the day they are hungry, and what their eating patterns are like.

It is likely that these dieters consume most of their calories in the evening, often eating right up until they go to bed. No wonder they’re not hungry in the morning.

But according to research (and clinical experience), skipping breakfast may indeed lead to less control over eating later on. Try an  an experiment for at least a couple of weeks: eat a protein-rich breakfast and then monitor your day and evening eating. You’ll end up with the same conclusion: eating (a balanced) breakfast really helps you eat more reasonably for the rest of the day.

Another important reason to eat your morning meal is if you’re one of those that workout in the morning. Eating before exercise is mandatory for (you) performance athletes to get the most out of your workout, recovery, and the results. Therefore, ingesting part of your daily calorie allotment before exercise is a practice everyone should do. Eating before training can:

• Fill energy stores before a workout
• Break the fast to boost metabolism and continue a constant flow of nutrients
• Increase workout performance: high intensity training burns two to three times more fat immediately post-exercise, thus greater total fat throughout the day
• Enhance recovery to improve maintenance or growth of muscle which also adds to your metabolic rate
• Increase daily non-exercise movements by never staying in a less energetic/fasting state beyond rising in the morning

It takes calories to burn more calories, but don’t add extra calories – simply take the total daily calories you are allowed and distribute them properly throughout the day based on your activities.

The bottom line is make sure you eat the most important meal of the day, breakfast.

Leidy, H. J., Lepping, R. J., Savage, C. R., & Harris, C. T. (5 May 2011).
Neural Responses to Visual Food Stimuli After a Normal vs. Higher Protein Breakfast in Breakfast-Skipping Teens: A Pilot fMRI Study.
Obesity Journal, (1-7). doi:10.1038/oby.2011.108

Sources:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/judith-s-beck-phd/breakfast-benefits_b_883021.html
http://www.dotfit.com/content-1498.html

Sports scientists used to think that the only way to burn fat was to do long sessions of moderate exercise, but recent studies have shown that short high-intensity training sessions also work. The fat burning doesn’t only happen during the intensive sessions, but goes on afterwards too. This is the phenomenon known as EPOC. Greek sports scientists discovered that over 65s can benefit from this way of exercising too, especially if they train with heavy weights.

The 40 men in the Greek study, which was published in Diabetes Care, were all on the heavy side, with an average BMI of 29. Although not physically active, they were healthy.

The researchers got the men to train for an hour. During the workout the men trained all of their large muscle groups, doing 3 sets of basic exercises.

The men were divided into 4 groups. The low-intensity group trained using weights of 45-50 percent of their 1RM and rested for 2 minutes between sets. The moderate-intensity group trained with 60-65 percent of their 1RM and rested for 4 minutes between sets. The high-intensity group trained with 80-85 percent of their 1RM and took 6-minute breaks between sets. The control group did nothing.

The low-intensity group burned 296 calories during the workout; the moderate-intensity group 282 calories and the high-intensity group 222 calories. The lactic acid level and concentrations of free fatty acids and glycerol [fat burning indicators] rose least during the high-intensity training session.

In the days following the training session, the adiponectin level remained considerably higher in the high-intensity group. Adiponectin is a hormone that makes muscles extract more nutrients from the blood. The cortisol level was lower in the high-intensity group than the other groups after the training session.

The high-intensity group had a raised energy expenditure [REE] for days after the test. During the period that the researchers took measurements, the men in the high-intensity group burned several hundred calories more. The energy was spent on helping the body to recover from the strength training. Almost all of this energy for EPOC is derived from fat.

“Overweight older men may benefit from training with a frequency of two to three resistance exercise sessions per week”, the Greeks conclude. “In addition, it appears that all resistance exercise schemes induce marked energy expenditure.” We take the liberty of adding that it’s training with heavy weights that drives up the calorie burning.

Source: Diabetes Care. 2009 Dec;32(12):2161-7.
Source: http://www.ergo-log.com/heavystrengthtrainingburns.html